Human Motion Institute

Joint Replacements & Reconstruction

Getting Back in Motion!

Taking care of a severely injured or diseased joint is more than applying state-of-the-art surgical techniques. It is the skilled hands-on evaluation and appropriate diagnostic testing that determines the best overall plan of care, remembering of course, that we are not treating a joint, but a human being.

Today, Americans are enjoying longer, more active lives than in any time in history. Yet, as we age our bodies change and a lifetime of activity and occasional abuse takes its toll on everyone. Sometimes those changes result in specific problems related to joints and muscles. Painful, stiff joints can become lifestyle altering and prevent many individuals from participating in the daily activities they enjoy. At the Human Motion Institute, we apply our clinical expertise to establish an accurate diagnosis quickly and develop a plan of care that fits the needs of each patient suffering from joint pain or discomfort.

It is our practice to exhaust every appropriate treatment option before considering surgery. However, if and when a surgical procedure becomes the right choice, our orthopedic surgeons are trained to correct problems related to joint pain. Our unique continuum of care approach produces outstanding clinical and patient satisfaction results. This integrated approach enables our clinical team to properly evaluate a patient's condition and prepare each patient mentally and physically for their procedure; then we continuously monitor and manage their entire pre- and post-surgical performance and progress. This full-service approach, which integrates the patient's primary care physician and orthopedic surgeon with a host of clinical support staff, is designed to return our patients to maximum function as quickly and safely as possible. Our affiliated orthopedic surgeons have the ability to replace all major joints including:

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Hip Replacement

Total hip replacement surgery replaces the upper end of the thighbone (femur) with a metal ball and resurfaces the hip socket in the pelvic bone with a metal shell and plastic liner. This surgery may be considered following a hip fracture (breaking of the bone) or for a person who has severe arthritis.

Various types of arthritis may affect the hip joint. Osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease that affects mostly middle-aged and older adults, may cause the breakdown of joint cartilage and adjacent bone in the hips. Rheumatoid arthritis, which causes inflammation of the synovial membrane and results in excessive synovial fluid, may lead to pain and stiffness. Traumatic arthritis (arthritis caused by injury), may cause damage to the articular cartilage of the hip. Patients with severe degenerative joint disease may be unable to do normal activities that involve bending at the hip, such as walking or sitting.

The goal of total hip replacement surgery is to replace the parts of the hip joint that have been damaged, or worn out, and to relieve hip pain that cannot be controlled with other treatments.

The decision to replace the painful hip with an artificial one is a joint decision between the patient and surgeon. Other alternative treatments may first be used, including but not limited to assistive walking devices, physical therapy and anti-inflammatory medications.

Knee Replacement

When a knee is so severely damaged by disease or injury, an artificial knee replacement may be considered. During knee replacement surgery, joint surfaces area substituted or replaced by prosthesis.

The most common condition that results in the need for knee replacement surgery is osteoarthritis, a degenerative joint disease, which affects mostly middle-aged and older adults. Osteoarthritis is characterized by the breakdown of joint cartilage and adjacent bones in the knee. There are other forms of arthritis such as rheumatoid arthritis and arthritis that results from a knee injury can also lead to degeneration of the knee joint.

The decision to replace the painful knee with an artificial one is a joint decision between the patient and surgeon. Other alternative treatments may first be used, including but not limited to assistive walking devices and anti-inflammatory medications.

What happens before surgery?

In addition to a complete medical history, the surgeon may perform a complete physical examination, including x-rays, to ensure that the patient is in good health before undergoing surgery. In additions, the patient may also meet with a physical therapist to discuss rehabilitation after the surgery and undergo blood tests (or any other ordered test). It is a good idea that the patient attends a total joint replacement class to understand what to expect in the hospital and ideas to prepare for discharge.

Cutting-edge treatment at Doctors Hospital

Doctors Hospital is the first hospital in the area to provide the conforMIS iUni and iDuo patient customized partial knee replacement implants!

A partial knee procedure refers to a surgery designed to treat just one or two compartments in a knee, a possibility when osteoarthritis is not present in all three components, and a great option for the younger, more active patient.

This implant is designed through Conformist’s iFit technology to optimize fit and performance of the knee replacement. Each implant is made specifically for each patient. Using 3D CT scan images, a patient’s own knee anatomy provides the template to create the customized knee implant. The implants are also combined with a resurfacing procedure that preserves more of the healthy bone and tissue and provide the opportunity for a smaller incision and shorter recovery time.

Benefits of a personalized implant for one to two compartments of the knee include:

  • Matching the individual’s shape and anatomy
  • More natural alignment
  • Better bone preservation
  • Less trauma than full total knee replacement
  • Potentially reduced recovery time

Shoulder Replacement

When arthritis has damaged or destroyed the shoulder joint, it may be replaced with a metal ball and plastic socket. Although there are many different types of shoulder replacements, the idea is that the damaged surfaces of the bone are replaced. The surgical procedure is generally considered more difficult and complex and the rehabilitation program is prolonged. However, with a well done procedure, a motivated patient can return to such activities as golf, swimming and tennis with little difficulty.

What happens before surgery?

In addition to a complete medical history, the surgeon may perform a complete physical examination, including x-rays, to ensure that the patient is in good health before undergoing surgery. Also, the patient may also meet with a physical therapist to discuss rehabilitation after the surgery and undergo blood tests (or any other ordered test).

How is the shoulder totally replaced?

In shoulder replacement surgery, surgeons replace the ends of the damaged upper arm bone (humerus) and usually the shoulder bone (scapula) or cap them with artificial surfaces lined with plastic or metal and plastic. Shoulder joint components may be held in place with cement, or they may be made with material that allows new bone to grow into the joint component over time to hold it in place without cement.

The top end of the upper arm bone is shaped like a ball. Muscles and ligaments hold this ball against a cup-shaped part of the shoulder bone. Surgeons usually replace the top of the upper arm bone with a long metal piece, inserted into your upper arm bone that has a rounded head. If the cup-shaped surface of the shoulder bone that cradles the upper arm bone is also damaged, surgeons smooth it and then cap it with a plastic or metal and plastic piece.

Orthopedic surgeons often use general anesthesia for joint replacement surgeries, which means the patient will be unconscious during surgery. However, sometimes they will use regional anesthesia, which means the patient can’t feel the area of the surgery and they are sleepy, but awake. The choice of anesthesia depends on the surgeon, anesthesiologist, the patient’s overall health, and, to some degree the patient’s preference.

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To be referred to a Human Motion Institute at Doctors Hospital affiliated specialist, please call (706) 651-4343.

To speak with our nurse navigator, please call (706) 651-4798.