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Majority of Physicians Concerned About Future of Medicine

Majority of Physicians Concerned About Future of Medicine

But most surveyed doctors also report being satisfied with practice of medicine

FRIDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Although physicians are concerned about the future of medicine, the majority are satisfied with practicing medicine and feel financial incentives could provide a way to motivate patients to change behavior, according to a survey conducted by the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions.

Paul H. Keckley, Ph.D., from the Deloitte Center for Health Solutions in Washington, D.C., and colleagues surveyed a random sample of 613 U.S. primary care and specialist physicians to examine their perspectives and attitudes toward health care.

The researchers found that most physicians are concerned about the future of medicine, with the majority reporting concerns related to the erosion of clinical autonomy and income and the inability to achieve medical liability reform. Nearly 70 percent are satisfied with practicing medicine, with satisfaction driven by patient relationships and the promotion and protection of health. Eighty percent of physicians feel that the future of medicine involves interdisciplinary teams and care coordination. The majority of physicians (73 percent) do not work in a setting that provides gain-sharing or incentive programs. Seventy-one percent of respondents believe financial incentives might work best for motivating patients to engage in healthy behaviors. Seventy percent feel these could improve treatment adherence, but only 55 percent feel that incentives are powerful enough to motivate lifestyle change, and 69 percent agree that cost-sharing incentives could be counterproductive.

"Most think incentives can be effective in changing consumer health if carefully implemented," according to the report.

More Information (http://www.deloitte.com/assets/Dcom-UnitedStates/Local%20Assets/Documents/us_chs_2013SurveyofUSPhysicians_031813.pdf )